Joint Ticket

18 03 2008

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Paddy Cake

17 03 2008
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Sunrise, Sunset

1 01 2008

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Cheers to a New Year and another chance for me to get it right.





Sunrise, Sunset

31 12 2007

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Infamous Date

7 12 2007

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San Diego

24 10 2007

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Ganesh Chaturthi

15 09 2007

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An important Indian festival, one of two I compulsively observe, and lasting ten days starts today, typically in late August or September and beholden to the lunar calendar. It ends on the day of Anantha Chaturdashi when images (clay statues) of the Elephant Lord Ganesh are immersed in the most conveniently proximate body of water. While most popular in my birth home state of Maharashtra, it is performed all over India and in Indian communities world wide. It assumes collosal proportions in Bombay and in the surrounding belt of Ashtavinayaka temples (8 deities) wherein all of the population, in literally millions, descends upon the streets in processions leading to the sea, dancing and singing to the rhythm of melodious yet LOUD cymbals and drums. In 1893, the reformit Lokmanya Tilak transformed the annual Ganesh festival from from private family celebration to a grand public event to bridge the gap between Brahmins (as is my family) and non-Brahmins) for an appropriate context to build new grassroots unity in nationalistic strivings against the British rulers. Ganesh has an appeal for everyman and serves as a good rallying point. Mr. Tilak was the first to install large public images of Ganesh in large pavilions (mandaps) and established the practice of submerging all images on the tenth day. Of all my childhood memories which were important to the family and did not involve travel of any kind, this one is the best and most resolute. Happy Ganesh Chaturthi to you.